The Diversity and Duality of Amazing Amphibians

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The Diversity and Duality of Amazing Amphibians

The inaugural Amphibian Week, starting on June 1, is a time to celebrate not just the exceptional qualities of amphibians, but to also bring awareness to the critical importance of conserving their habitats.

© Steve Atkins

The word amphibian stems from the Greek word amphibios, which means to live a double life– and do these magnificent creatures ever! Spending their larval stage breathing through gills in water, typically followed by their adult stage breathing through lungs on land, amphibians are some of the most unique animals on earth.

© Steve Atkins

There are three classifications of amphibians: toads and frogs, newts and salamanders, and caecilians. While there are over 5,600 living amphibians, most of which are frogs, they face threats ranging from habitat loss and invasive species to disease and contaminants. During Amphibian Week, ARC will be sharing facts and encouraging ways to conserve the habitats and livelihood of these mostly nocturnal, ectothermic (cold-blooded) creatures.

To gear up for the event, let’s take a look at some fun amphibian facts:

  • Amphibians breathe and absorb water through their thin skin.
  • The Olm, also known as the “Human Fish,” can live to be 100 years old!
  • You can find amphibians nearly everywhere… except the South Pole.
  • The smallest amphibian is a 0.03-inch (7.7 mm) frog from New Guinea, while the largest is the Chinese Giant Salamander measuring 5 feet, 11 inches (1.8 m).

Get ready to join us on June 1 for the start of Amphibian Week! Follow us on social media to learn more about how we will be celebrating this annual event, and help promote Amphibian Week by using the hashtag #AmphibianWeek.